Nov
04
2022

Stars that Freeze: White Dwarf Crystallization as Revealed by Gaia featuring Simon Blouin (University of Victoria) (Opens in a new window)

Online

Seminars

White dwarfs are stellar embers that simply cool down for the rest of time, eventually freezing into a solid state. This predictable evolution makes them precise cosmic clocks; they have been used for decades to measure the ages of stellar populations. But data from the Gaia space observatory is now calling into question the accuracy of this age dating technique. The cooling process appears to be much more delayed by the onset of crystallization than predicted by current models. I will present my recent work on the physics of core crystallization.

Oct
21
2022

Multidimensional Modelling of Magnetic Fields in Supernovae and Their Progenitors featuring Vishnu Varma (Keele, UK) (Opens in a new window)

Online

Seminars

Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are some of the brightest, most energetic events in the universe. In order to model these phenomena accurately, we need to have a diverse range of physics such as neutrino transport and neutrino interactions, general-relativistic gravity, detailed equations of state (EoS) of dense matter, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and detailed progenitor models.

Oct
17
2022

Remnants of Neutron-star Mergers: Connecting Hydrodynamics Models to Nuclear, Neutrino, and Kilonova Physics (Opens in a new window)

Darmstadt, Germany

Workshops & Conferences

This EMMI+IReNA Workshop will bring together experts from the four areas hydrodynamic simulations, neutrino-flavor physics, r-process nucleosynthesis, and kilonova modeling. The goal is to identify the main shortcomings of current models and to discuss strategies for how to propagate modeling uncertainties into r-process abundances and kilonova predictions, thereby improving models in a way to maximize the scientific output of future multi-messenger observations of neutron star mergers.

Oct
07
2022

The Contribution of Classical Novae to the Galactic Abundance of 26Al featuring Laetitia Canete (University of Surrey, UK) (Opens in a new window)

Online

Seminars

The discovery of radioactive 26Al via the observation of the 1809-keV γ ray in 1982 is one of the most famous pieces of evidence of on-going nucleosynthesis in the cosmos. The 26Al is likely to be produced dominantly in massive stars and supernovae. Nevertheless, a number of additional sources such as classical novae and AGB stars may still contribute considerably to the production of 26Al. Thus, up to 29% of the total observed 26Al abundance is predicted to have a nova origin. 

Sep
17
2022

Diving Into Math with Emmy Noether (Opens in a new window)

FRIB Laboratory, Michigan State University

Outreach

Please join us at 7:00pm at the FRIB Laboratory (Room 1300 Auditorium) for this performance! This event is free and open to the public. A small reception will follow the performance, and FRIB scientists will be available to chat with the public afterwards.

Aug
29
2022

Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics X School (Opens in a new window)

Geneva, Switzerland

Workshops & Conferences

The school is connected to the International Conference on Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics X and aims at introducing important concepts related to nuclear astrophysics, including experimental and theoretical nuclear physics, astrophysics and astronomical observations.

Jul
16
2022

PAN-CAKE masterclass for educators 2022 (Opens in a new window)

Outreach

PAN-CAKE is a free online masterclass for teachers scheduled on Saturday July 16th, 2022. Science teachers (from pre-service to veterans) in the US and Canada will learn about world-class scientific research in nuclear astrophysics at MSU’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams. This is an opportunity to meet scientists and other educators, take a “virtual tour” of a leading rare isotope laboratory, collect tools and demos for your curriculum, and discover the future of research. 

Jun
12
2022

Astrophysics with Radioactive Isotopes (AwRI 2022) (Opens in a new window)

Budapest, Hungary

Workshops & Conferences

Radioactive nuclei play a significant role in many current astrophysical pursuits, from the origin of the elements to the driving of emissions from supernovae ($^5$$^6$Ni) and kilonovae (r-process radioactivity). Radioactive nuclei are crucial for direct studies of galactic enrichment ($^7$Be, $^2$$^6$Al, $^4$$^4$Ti, $^6$$^0$Fe, $^9$$^9$Tc, $^2$$^4$$^4$Pu) and stellar explosions ($^5$$^6$Ni, $^4$$^4$Ti). Stars and their explosions, galaxies and their evolving interstellar medium, and the origin of the solar system are among the targeted astrophysical objects.

Jun
01
2022

Stellar Modelling for Nuclear Astrophysics Summer School! (SMNASS) (Opens in a new window)

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

School

This summer school is intended to teach the application of stellar modelling using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) to those in the nuclear-astrophysics community and other interested researchers. Stellar modelling applications are becoming increasingly robust, and the availability of models for various stellar environments of interest to the nuclear-astrophysics community is constantly increasing.

Jun
01
2022

Stellar Modelling for Nuclear Astrophysics Summer School (SMNASS) (Opens in a new window)

Baton Rouge, LA

Workshops & Conferences

This summer school is intended to teach the application of stellar modelling using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) to those in the nuclear-astrophysics community and other interested researchers. Stellar modelling applications are becoming increasingly robust, and the availability of models for various stellar environments of interest to the nuclear-astrophysics community is constantly increasing.

Apr
05
2022

Topical Meeting of IReNA - FA1 Nuclear reaction measurements in Underground Laboratories (Opens in a new window)

Rome, Italy

Workshops & Conferences

The Focus Area 1 (FA1) of the International Research Network for Nuclear Astrophysics (IReNA) is concerned with the determination of nuclear reaction rates of critical astrophysical importance in the laboratory using a broad range of experimental approaches, including heavy ion storage rings, deep underground laboratories, intense photon beams, neutron beams, and recoil separators at stable and rare isotope accelerator facilities.